Tag Archives: Pinot Grigio

Pinot Gris vs Pinot Grigio

I recently tasted 130 samples of New Zealand wines labelled as “Pinot Gris” and one example labelled as “Pinot Grigio”. When a wine is labelled as Pinot Gris I expect it to be modelled after the luscious, opulent and rich wines from the Alsace region of France. When the wine is described as “Pinot Grigio” I anticipate it being crisp, lean and racy like a typical Italian Pinot Grigio.

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Tasmanian Wine Show

Five gold medals were awarded to the 2013 pinot noirs entered in this year’s Tasmanian Wine Show, an impressive hit-rate of 10%. My tasting notes for the 49 wines have been posted on the app, together with the 2013 rieslings, 2013-14 pinot gris and grigios

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Mixed whites

Bored with great chardonnay, riesling and semillon? It’s a first world problem. Happily, there’s a solution. ‘Alternative’ varieties of white wine are growing in number and popularity – even if they are still a small niche category. As much as I love chardonnay, riesling, semillon

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Pinot G

Pinot Gris is New Zealand’s fastest growing export wine. At a time when wine sales are fairly flat throughout the world Pinot Gris exports are growing at the comparatively heady rate of 15%. Pinot Gris is a Dr Jekyll and Mr Hide grape variety with dual personalities. It has two style benchmarks: the Italian model (labelled Pinot Grigio) which tends to be light, crisp, dry and racy; and the French/Alsatian model (labelled as Pinot Gris) which is typically richer and more luscious with stronger, riper flavours.

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All Saints Celebrates 150-Years

The Brown family has done marvelous things with All Saints since taking over the iconic Rutherglen winery in the late 1990s. The winery with its Terrace restaurant (which recently received a hat from The Age Good Food Guide), gardens, magnificent avenue of elms and historic

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Whites From Left-field

Here I go again, extolling the virtues of left-field white varietals and blends. A feller can only drink so much chardonnay, riesling, semillon and sauvignon blanc. We need variety in our diet. Among the 85 ‘alternative’ white variety reviews uploaded this month are fiano, vermentino,

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Rash of golds for top Tassie drops

Tasmania’s strengths of riesling, chardonnay, pinot noir and sparkling wine were confirmed at the recent 2014 Tasmanian Wine Show. Sauvignon blanc, which might be expected to shine in the island state, was disappointing, and pinot gris/grigio was just so-so. On one hand we could be tempted to conclude that Tasmanians are crazy to grow anything but riesling, chardonnay and pinot noir; on the other, it would be nice to have more diversity.