Tag Archives: Coolangatta Estate

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The NSW wine all-stars

New South Wales is different. Its 16 wine regions are very diverse geographically, climatically and wine-wise, and together they offer an entirely different palette to Victoria or South Australia – not necessarily better or less good, but different.

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New tasting notes

This month sees a major tasting of cabernet sauvignon, cabernet blends and merlots, with a welter of great Aussie cabernets to choose from. Blinders from Plantagenet (tasting), Flametree SRS (tasting), Evans & Tate Redbrook (tasting), Castelli (tasting), Penfolds Bin 8 Cabernet Shiraz (tasting – great value discovery), Laurance Icon (tasting), Xanadu Reserve (tasting) and

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Aussie Aglianico makes a Great Food Wine

An American wine writer, W. Blake Grey, recently included in his rather interesting list of 10 things he’d learnt as a wine retailer: 1) the wine press loves unusual varieties but consumers do not, and 2) most people don’t care about wine-food pairing (www.palatepress.com). Mr Grey’s mistake is that he keeps referring to “the average wine consumer” or “most people” – and he’s probably right about them – but “average wine consumers” don’t read wine columns. Reading about wine is for people who are really interested.

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Lie Back and Dream of New England

For one of Australia’s newest official wine regions, a small and embryonic region with less than 200 hectares of vines and seven wineries, New England is impressive. Considering its size, it delivers beyond expectations. On my first visit there to judge its local wine show two weeks ago, I had some trepidation. Would there be any wines worthy of a gold medal? Would the judges deliver a handful of bronze medals and make more enemies than friends?

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Alternative Varieties do well for Boutiques

As a critic, I get to taste enormous quantities of shiraz, cabernet, chardonnay and sauvignon blanc and its various blends, and sometimes it seems that choice – one of wine’s greatest fascinations – is contracting. It often seems the hegemony of the main varieties is pushing the alternatives out of the picture. In Australia’s vineyards, 72% of the vines are of the varieties mentioned above. That leaves just 28% for the other 100 or so varieties we grow.