Leftover wine

Winesave PRO contains enough gas to preserve 150 bottles of wine. (Photo: Winesave)

To prevent leftover wine from going to waste, it is worth acquiring a few preservation tools.

When you think about all the effort that goes into producing a bottle of wine, one never wants to waste a drop. However, it is inevitable that you will occasionally find yourself with leftover wine.

Though one can always cook with leftover wine. Beef and red wine pie is a staple in our household.

I find that the very best wines actually get better over a number of days without any form of preservation. For example, a high-quality, young riesling with long cellaring potential, can actually bloom the day after opening.

However, there are other wines that look highly aromatic in a morning tasting, but then lose their charm by the evening.

In reality, it is very difficult to predict which wines will get better, and which ones won’t. So, to be safe, it is a good idea to have some wine preservation tools on-hand.

If you find yourself with half a 750ml bottle remaining, one easy technique it to pour it into a clean, dry 375ml bottle. If you fill it to the brim, seal and place it in the fridge, you will extend the life of the leftover wine.

The product Winesave is one of the simplest ways to preserve an opened bottle. One squirt delivers enough food grade argon gas to sit above the surface of the wine, protecting the wine from the ingress of oxygen. Winesave PRO contains enough gas to preserve 150 bottles of wine. Not bad for AUD $35.

Leftover sparkling wine can be a bit of a nuisance, mainly because the bottle can’t be resealed with its own cork, so it needs to stand upright in the fridge. Avina makes a handy ‘Champagne and Wine’ stopper that allows you to store a bottle of open bubbly lying down. The fizz won’t be as effervescent as on the day of opening, but the carbon dioxide gas (which is what makes the wine bubbly) will help protect the flavours for a day, or two, after opening.

Of course, there other more complicated, and expensive methods available, but I use the above strategies with good success.

Though one can always cook with leftover wine. Beef and red wine pie is a staple in our household.

One thought on “Leftover wine”

  1. Caleb Griffiths says:

    Screw top half bottles are great for storing left over wine, as are the smaller tonic bottles. ensure a minimal air gap and the wine keeps for weeks. At a pinch, the addition of a small amount of water will do the job. Way more effective that gas systems. Cost is nil!

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