Frankenwine takes a step closer

Colorado company Replica Wine makes its living copying popular US wines such as The Prisoner. (Photo: Gear Patrol website)

News reports of white-coated chemists in laboratories concocting wine without any help from grapes are hardly new. But they do seem to fascinate lots of readers. The latest is a report in the New York Times, which claims a synthesised wine fooled an experienced sommelier. Words like ‘Frankenwine’ are bandied about.

The latest is a report in the New York Times, which claims a synthesised wine fooled an experienced sommelier.

Reactions seem to fall into two camps: those who worry their world is coming to an end because traditional winemaking may be on the skids, and those who leap with glee, punching their air and shouting “Yes! I always suspected wine was nonsense and now we know it’s true”. The emperor is unclothed.

Colorado company Replica Wine makes its living copying popular US wines such as The Prisoner. It cheerfully markets them in competition with the originals at half the price, using cheeky names such as Knockoff and Pickpocket.

Two reactions from fellow readers:

“I hope they can clone some Romanée-Conti for me.”

“Can’t wait for the cloned Latour to match the laboratory beef.”

 

One thought on “Frankenwine takes a step closer”

  1. Greg Morthole says:

    Should pay for it with replica money

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